Psychogeography Extreme – Phil Smith (+ one small fracture)

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We were disappointed not to be able to attend the recent Fourth World Congress of Psychogeography, which by all accounts was a great success.

The opening address by Phil Smith (aka Crab Man, aka Mythogeography), is a fascinating and thought-provoking missive on the state of psychogeography and the walking arts today.  You can read, download and share it here:

Psychogeography Extreme

Also check out Phil’s Mythogeography website – ‘an ambulatory goldmine’ and his books published by Triarchy Press.

≈≈≈

One of the points Phil makes is the need to rethink the drift on a smaller scale. In the gaps, in the smallest fractures, in small disruptions to personal routines; the late running of a train that allows you a few minutes to explore the hinterland around a station.

A recent personal example was the unexpected distress visit to a garage when a section of exhaust pipe fell off the car. Whilst the new part was being sourced and fitted, a short walk around the immediate environs:

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Crack-

ed slab scree

c  o  b  b  l  e  s

   c  o  b  b  l  e  d

in    p O O l

-ing   light

≈≈≈

Now playing: The Soft Machine – s/t (with a nod to Boyle Family).

This entry was posted in Field Trip, Poetry, Psychogeography, rag-pickings, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Psychogeography Extreme – Phil Smith (+ one small fracture)

  1. LindyK says:

    footbook 🙂

  2. annjrippin says:

    I agree about smaller drifts. Much better idea than sitting staring at your phone.

  3. stevedsmart says:

    ‘the walking arts’ – good phrase! Is that a thing? I hope so 🙂

  4. Thanks Steve. There are a couple of books that spring to mind that might be worth a look: ‘The Art of Walking: A Field Guide’ edited by David Evans and ‘Walk On, From Richard Long to Janet Cardiff, 40 Years of Art Walking’. The latter is a catalogue to what was a touring exhibition but I think can still be gotten hold of and works as a book on its own. Both texts have numerous examples of the quite diverse practices of walking artists.

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